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The Arizona Telemedicine Program Blog

Telemediquette (ˈteləˌ ˈmedəkət) noun: the art and science of developing telemedicine protocols for technology used to communicate medical information at a distance.

Medical etiquette is defined as the code of ethical behavior regarding professional practice or action among the members of a profession in their dealings with each other.

Pediatric nurse practitioner Amber Wright schedules initial patient visits for 90 minutes. A follow-up visit is 60 minutes, or sometimes 45.

The reason for these longer-than-usual appointments is that Wright is certified in the field of developmental pediatrics, in which she focuses her practice on children with developmental disabilities.

The healthcare market is changing. Patients’ expectations of convenience and quality are fueling their healthcare purchase decisions. Meanwhile, retail clinics, urgent cares, and direct-to-consumer telemedicine companies are entering the market in droves, giving patients more options outside the primary care relationship. As a consequence, health systems are finding patient engagement increasingly important.

Ryan Casey, MD, is in his third-year of residency training in family and community medicine at Yuma Regional Medical Center, a 406-bed hospital less than 10 miles from the Mexican border in southwestern Arizona.

A man who holds citizenship in both Mexico and the U.S., Dr. Casey is committed to providing care to patients in both countries.

Dr. Waer (center) visiting Tuba Regional Medical Center’s telemedicine facility with Janet Major and Lynn Bedonie

Amy Waer, MD, professor of surgery and associate dean for medical education at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson, has taken on a new major responsibility, as medical director of the Arizona Telemedicine Program (ATP).

Her goal is to leverage all three roles to enhance medical education opportunities in rural Arizona. 

“I especially like having the opportunity to use my position as associate dean to work with telemedicine and link the two together,” said Dr. Waer, who was named ATP medical director in June.  

A lot of people seem to think our political process is broken.

They might have a hard time getting some very bright junior high and high school students to see it their way. Here’s why.

The Arizona Telemedicine Program (ATP) was fortunate to be a part of the Arizona SciTech’s Chief Science Officer Institute at Grand Canyon College in July. The Chief Science Officers (CSOs) are sixth-grade to 12th-grade students from schools throughout Arizona.

Dr. Bruce Coull taking part in a mock consultation.

Physicians can sometimes be hesitant to begin hosting video visits because they are weary about just how effective the technology can be when treating patients. However once physicians begin hosting video visits they are often shocked at how versatile video technology can be as an additional tool to administering care. Below is a summary of some of the most intriguing use cases that I have observed from telehealth providers.


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